Search Articles

How-To

  • Learn how to turn fall leaves into a soil-enriching mulch.
  • Winter is the ideal time to spend a few hours trimming and repotting the plants around your home.
  • If you want to get your vegetable garden off to a fast start, you need to plant your seeds in soil that's warm enough to ensure good germination.
  • How to grow and wide variety of annuals.
  • How to grow, select and care for roses.
  • How to grow fruits and berries in your own backyard.
  • By using a few simple season-extending techniques and plant-protection devices, you can shield your plants from extremes of weather, and stretch your gardening season by two, three or even six months.
  • How to work with nature to control pests and diseases, and enjoy a healthier garden and harvest.
  • Learn how to compost your kitchen and yard waste, using a compost bin, a pile or a composter.
  • How to build fertile, healthy garden soil.
  • How to plant and grow Asiatic Lilies, Oriental Lilies and more.
  • A list of flowering plants that slugs don't like.
  • How to identify yellow jackets, honeybees, bumblebees and other stinging insects. Techniques for preventing problems.
  • How to build a healthy, thriving lawn without chemical fertilizers or pesticides.
  • How to keep your houseplants healthy and pest-free.
  • How to grow your own vegetables and keep your plants healthy and vigorous.
  • How to grow bulbs, from daffodils to dahlias.
  • How to propagate, care for and harvest herbs.
  • Learn how to get your backyard certified by the National Wildlife Federation.
  • To create beautiful flowering planters, it helps to pick the right plants. Browse our gallery of flowering pots, planters, hanging baskets, windowboxes and more. You’ll find plenty of inspiration – and detailed plant lists, so you can recreate the look at home.
  • Dreaming of a backyard berry patch? An asparagus bed? Start with a raised bed. A raised bed isolates the perennial crop from invasive weeds and grasses that might creep into the growing area. All have shallow roots that don't compete well with weeds and that can be damaged by aggressive weeding tools.
  • Use Super Hoops to support garden fabric, row covers, shade netting and bird netting. Protect your crops from pests, insects, diseases and extreme weather.
  • In summer, most berries demand nothing more than picking. But when it comes to raspberries, some pruning sets the stage for bountiful berries again next year.
  • Peruse the annual plant awards to get a glimpse of what to expect at garden centers in spring.
  • Learn how to put mason bees to work, pollinating your garden.
  • Mid- to late summer is the time plant diseases become noticeable in gardens and landscapes. Some of the most common diseases found on flowers the home garden include powdery mildew, gray mold (Botrytis), and black spot.
  • It's hard to beat hostas for shade. But, there are plenty of rugged, carefree, shade-tolerant perennials.
  • If there's a "sure bet" perennial, it must be the daylily. They thrive from Minnesota to Florida (zones 3 to 9), tolerate a wide variety of soil conditions, are not troubled by diseases or pests, and bloom faithfully for years with virtually no attention.
  • Learn how to grow and harvest edible flowers.
  • How to keep lily leaf beetles from destroying your lilies.
  • Does my houseplant need water? When is it time to water the vegetable garden? To know when to water, you have to check the soil.
  • Making pesto is a wonderful way to preserve the summer's basil harvest.
  • Giving a gift you've made yourself sends a message of caring to the recipient, and using homegrown materials makes it even more special. Summer is the time to gather and prepare flowers and herbs so you'll have plenty of gift-making materials.
  • Shower friends and family with garden-inspired bath and body treats using fragrant essential oils
  • Learn how to turn your garden into a more compelling destination in the evening hours.
  • How to incorporate wildflowers and native plants into your landscape.
  • How butterflies, bees, hummingbirds and other animals insure our gardens and crops.
  • How to successfully grow plants in containers, indoors and out.
  • Well-fed plants are healthier, more productive and more beautiful. This article covers the basics of why and how to fertilize your garden.
  • Well-chosen plants change the garden scene from bleak to beautiful.
  • How to design your dream garden.
  • There's a new sort of garden in town. It's easy to install, looks good all year, requires almost no maintenance and has a very positive impact on the environment. No wonder rain gardens are such a hot gardening trend!
  • A comprehensive guide to orchid care
  • Use lights to grow an abundance of stocky, green seedlings or pamper indoor flowering plants. The right lights will keep them blooming almost year-round.
  • All about creating compost with worms
  • Learn how to create a colorful indoor garden in this step-by-step guide. In less than an hour, you can plant a terrarium.
  • How to grow plants indoors and surround yourself with plants year-round.
  • The basics of garden design, plant selection and care.
  • Finding the site, choosing plants and fish.
  • How to choose the type and size of greenhouse for your backyard.
  • How to understand the differences between potato types and what you can expect in the kitchen.
  • Learn the best way to start your own tomato seedlings. Quick to germinate and grow, tomato seeds are best sown indoors about six weeks before your average last frost date.
  • How to use the Carrot Grow Bag. Complete details on how to plant and harvest.
  • Learn how to grow the canna lily, a tropical beauty that provides plenty of color in summer.
  • Today's gardeners can choose from a wide range of flower forms, colors and heights, so there's certainly a gladiolus for everyone's taste.
  • Raised beds are the easiest and most productive way to garden. They're easier to plant, tend and harvest than in-ground beds — and now they're easier to water, too.
  • For a great new look in container gardens, think succulents! These fleshy-leaved plants thrive in the simplest of pots and their distinctive shapes and colors provide endless opportunities for creativity.
  • Grow stronger seedlings, harvest bigger — and earlier — tomato crops and give yourself a green star for using a renewable resource. How? Simply add coir to your growing repertoire.
  • Learn how to create a seedstarting schedule. By starting seeds at the proper time, you'll have strong, well-rooted transplants when spring arrives.
  • Expert advice and answers to frequently asked questions about starting plants from seed.
  • How to create a backyard habitat for wildlife, such as birds, frogs, pollinators and fish.
  • Getting fruit flies out of the kitchen takes a bit of persistence, but it isn’t difficult and doesn’t require any pesticides.
  • How to plant and grow peonies.
  • Make the most of climbing plants by providing the right kind of support.
  • A get-rich-quick type of composting.
  • Some annuals are especially easy to grow. Learn how.
  • How to compose a springtime garden that features wave after wave of blooms.
  • Cold hardiness is not the only factor that determines whether a plant will survive in your garden or not. Too much heat can be just as damaging to a plant as too much cold.
  • It's the most important season of the year for improving your soil. What should you be adding to your soil this fall? Three things: finished compost, raw organic matter, and organic nutrients.
  • When it comes to tulips, plant generously. Trench-planting method makes it easy.
  • Every flower gardener should enjoy the pleasure of growing clematis. If you already have a plant or two in your garden, you’re probably scheming about how to squeeze in another one!
  • Beans are one of the easiest crops to grow in a home garden. Plant a bean seed, and it will almost certainly grow and produce a generous crop with little effort on the part of the gardener.
  • Stephen Saint-Onge shows how to add relaxed ambiance and organization to any room
  • Pruning is a perfect chore for late-winter and early spring because most trees and shrubs are dormant. What's more, it's the time of year when there are few gardening tasks on your list.
  • Tomato plants are easy to grow, and they're one of the easiest plants to start indoors from seed. Here's how to grow your own tomatoes, from seed to harvest.
  • A useful — but not foolproof — guideline for selecting plants
  • Preserving in jars is simple and foolproof.
  • Tomatoes are consistently the most popular vegetable in American gardens. But for most gardeners, just any old tomato won't do.
  • Climbing plants climb in particular ways: some wrap, some adhere, and some curl. Learn to recognize which plants do what, so you can choose the right kind of trellis or support.
  • If you are new to growing vegetables in containers, or have had limited success, here are a few tips to help you succeed.
  • Beautiful, bountiful planters depend on good soil, fertilizer and careful watering. But to take your planters from standard to sensational, you need the right plants. Start with this simple rule: Combine plants with three different habits. In other words, thrillers, fillers and spillers.
  • If you find yourself with more vegetables than time, here are a few of the super-quick, after-work solutions for saving some of summer's bounty for cold winter days.
  • What is a nature-loving, generally peaceful soul to do when voles, woodchucks, squirrels, gophers, rabbits, moles, and other furry little mammals wreak havoc on our gardens?
  • If you have some fancy tropical plants in your garden this year and want to try your hand at overwintering them, you have a few options.
  • How to turn fall leaves into fuel for next year's garden.
  • Learn how to choose the right light for growing plants and seedlings indoors.
  • How to make sure your soil is rich in beneficial micro-organisms that keep plants thriving, pest-free and beautiful.
  • How to store the summer harvest for the winter kitchen.
  • Planting pollen- and nectar-rich flowers is a very important way to help counter the decline in pollinator populations. Most bees are attracted to flowers for their pollen as well as their nectar.
  • Techniques for repelling deer.
  • How to attract a variety of birds to your yard.
  • Techniques for creating a garden that looks great all summer -- without a lot of maintenance.
  • When winter's chill forces the gardener to move indoors, windowsills come into bloom.
  • No matter how large or small your garden, almost everyone has room for a few spring bulbs.
  • Once temperatures have cooled down in early fall, it's time to plant all over again for a second harvest that will be ready by early winter.
  • In the garden, perennials reign from May to mid-July, but annuals are the key to ensuring late-season color.
  • Plant a garden with bouquets in mind. By choosing carefully, you can have a steady supply of blooms -- from the first daffodils of April to the last mums of November.
  • There are dozens of techniques for mulching your vegetable garden. For best results, match the mulch to the crop, weather conditions and soil.
  • If you and your garden have entered the midsummer doldrums, here are a few tricks to perk you both up.
  • Techniques for keeping weeds at bay.
  • Expert advice on starting your own plants from seed.
  • Saving seeds is one of gardening's best-kept secrets. When else in life can you get something for nothing?
  • If you have an established perennial garden that's more than two or three years old, chances are good that you have some plants out there (probably quite a few) that need your attention.
  • Why do most New Year's resolutions focus on things you should do, and not things you want to do? Instead, we decided to come up with some garden resolutions that you'll want to keep!
  • During the hottest part of the summer, it’s especially important to make the most of every drop of water. With so much information available it can be challenging to separate fact from fiction. Learn the five common myths about watering.
  • For most of us, mosquitoes and other insect pests are mere annoyances, but sometimes they pose real threats.
  • All gardeners want to be green — except when it comes to water. Whether you have a fountain, pond or a small reflecting pool, chances are good that at some point you'll have to deal with nuisance algae.
  • When starting seeds indoors, you don’t want to use regular potting soil. It's too heavy and dense for the delicate, hair-like roots of a newly-germinated seed.
  • Controlling bunnies with fences, repellents and other techniques.
  • Because there are so many varieties, choosing dahlias is much more difficult than growing them. With a little effort, you can save the tubers for another year.
  • With up to 8-inch, showy flowers that bloom from summer to fall, tuberous begonias provide all-season color when planted in containers and beds.
  • By combining different types of irises, you can have them in bloom from early spring right into the summer.
  • If you want to keep your perennial borders looking great from May through September, you need to be prepared to fill a few holes.
  • Weed-blocking cloth keeps garden pathways looking sharp.
  • A list of 10 easy-to-grow perennials that usually bloom in their first growing season. Complete how-to, plus seed-starting tips.
  • Learn to grow sweet potatoes in garden beds, raised beds or our Potato Grow Bags.
  • A simple technique brings out flavor in the backyard harvest.
  • The key tools are support grids, rings, metal linking stakes, bamboo stakes and poles. If you have a few of each kind on hand, you'll be ready for the season's challenges.
  • Identifying the problem is the first step in finding an earth-friendly way to reduce the damage caused by garden foes. Our directory features the most common causes of garden problems.
  • Choosing the trees, shrubs and perennials that birds like.
  • Learn how to plant raspberries in a step-by-step slideshow.
  • Daffodils deliver—by far—more flowers for a longer time with less care than any other bulbs you can plant. They’ll thrive just about anywhere, and come back year after year in ever greater numbers.
  • Dahlias, gladiolus and other spring-planted bulbs add hot color and fragrance to any garden.
  • There are lots of great reasons to make your yard and garden more welcoming to birds. But here's one more: pest control!
  • A list of dependable, long-lived perennials
  • Tips for making your backyard a little more private.
  • Left on their own, tomatoes will grow into shrubby, multi-stemmed plants that topple under the weight of their fruit. Proper pruning will help prevent this problem.
  • Fertilize every time you mow the lawn.
  • Clever ideas for supporting tomato vines
  • If you want to get compost in a hurry, there are a few things you can do to speed the process along.
  • Here are some of our favorite perennials that tolerate dry conditions. Drought-tolerance varies from one region to the other, so be sure to get advice from good gardeners in your area. For more ideas, check with your local Cooperative Extension office.
  • How to get your lilac to bloom profusely.
  • Freezing and drying techniques.
  • Simple technique makes good use of plentiful fall leaves.
  • What's wrong with my tomatoes? Learn how to diagnose and treat tomato problems.
  • What to do when your compost doesn't seem right.
  • Inspect houseplants thoroughly before moving them indoors for the winter.
  • Tips for making fresh-cut evergreen boughs and wreaths last longer.
  • Winter can be a dark time because the days are so much shorter. To change things, add a little light.
  • Starting seeds for the first time? Here's a list of seeds that are quick to germinate and don't require a lot of extra fussing.
  • Techniques for water plants grown in tubs or pools.
  • Perennials, trees and shrubs that thrive in wet or poorly drained soil.
  • Learn how gardeners can help keep invasive plants from spreading and damaging our wetlands and forests.
  • Kale and collards are very similar plants, both grown for their flavorful and nutritious greens. The primary difference between them is that collards tolerate heat, while kale prefers cool temperatures.
  • It's possible to dramatically reduce your consumption of water, lower your water bill and still have a beautiful, productive garden.
  • With some thoughtful plant selection and placement, you can reduce the amount of lawn that you maintain by at least 25 percent, and enjoy a lower maintenance yard that still looks neat and well cared for.
  • By planting wildlife-friendly gardens, backyard gardeners can help reverse the habitat destruction and species loss that has occurred over the last century.
  • There's no easier way to improve plant health, pest and disease resistance, flower and fruit production and overall beauty.
  • Gardeners have questions — and we have answers. You'll find some of the most frequently asked questions answered here.
  • Techniques to help plants survive periods when rainfall is insufficient.
  • People often say weeds are good indicators of soil conditions. But what does that really mean, and what should gardeners do with the clues weeds provide?
  • How to trap troublesome animal pests.
  • Fencing is the only sure-fire way to keep wild and domestic animals out of a prized garden.
  • Flower gardener and outdoor living expert Debra Prinzing says, "It seems like backyard gardeners are rediscovering cutting gardens. Thank goodness!"
  • When dry weather continues for an extended period, landscape trees depend on homeowners for water. Learn when to water and how to do it.
  • After reading reviews of how our customers are using our Border Fence, we were inspired to share some of them with you.
  • I'm passionate about pickles. That's why caring for my cucumber crop tops my list of garden chores. And to me, there is nothing worse than a soggy, limp, crunch-less pickle. My biggest goal is to make sure they stay crisp!
  • For drama in the garden, there's nothing like a brugmansia. Known as the angel's trumpet, this showstopper has 6-10" fragrant blooms. Because of all their beauty, it's worth saving a brugmansia from year to year. It's easy.
  • Build a landscape with modular containers.
  • How to grow indoor-blooming amaryllis.
  • This guide will help you enjoy being outdoors, even during mosquito season.
  • Guide for using fabric row covers to protect your plants from cold, sun or pests.
  • This guide will help you choose the right composter for your situation.
  • It's easy to see why outdoor solar lighting is all the rage: no electricity required, no wiring. You can install it yourself.
  • Solar-powered lights are an increasingly popular choice for garden and landscape lighting. They are affordable, easy to install and can be relocated easily.
  • When you grow seedlings under our lights, you won't see the usual signs of light starvation. Instead, you'll notice straight, stocky seedlings with well-developed leaves and root systems.
  • This guide will help you control Japanese beetles in your yard and garden.
  • You may have heard that you can change the color of a hydrangea's flowers by adjusting soil pH. But there's a little more to it than that.
  • Learn how to repot your tomato seedlings when they've grown too large for the original pot.
  • How to use coffee grounds in your compost bin.
  • When faced with a flat of crowded seedlings, use a scissors to thin them out.
  • Tips for keeping squirrels away.
  • Young seedlings are especially vulnerable to a disease called damping-off. It's a fungus that enters young seedlings from the soil, causing the seedlings to die — often within days.
  • A guide to feeders, birdbaths and shelters.
  • In recent years, it's been easier to find sustainably grown flowers for bouquets — from your florist or your backyard. Complete the picture with earth-friendly flower-arranging techniques.
  • The trick to harvesting melons is figuring out when that moment of peak flavor occurs, because each type of melon displays different sorts of clues to its ripeness. Learn how to tell when your melons are just right.
  • There are more than two dozen North American bird species that prefer to nest in a natural cavity. These cavity-nesting birds will often adapt to nesting in a birdhouse (also known as an artificial nesting box).
  • Leeks are easy to grow. They require little to no attention and are generally pest-free.
  • How to plant and grow lilacs successfully, with tips on preventing problems with insects and diseases.
  • Too many gardeners plant salad greens just once a year. By planting continuously and thinking creatively about how to establish microclimates, it’s surprisingly easy to eat beautiful, delicious, home-grown salads almost every day of the year.
  • What to do when your plant looks sick.
  • How can you prevent Tomato Blight? Unfortunately, there's no silver bullet for Late Blight. The most important thing you can do: be alert, be prepared.
  • Berries and other so-called small fruits generally don't require as much space as full-size fruit trees, and by growing several different types, you can enjoy home-grown fruit from early summer through late fall.
  • The key to keeping cyclamen happy and healthy is to replicate their natural environment as closely as possible.
  • If you want to grow flowers from seed, start with sweet peas. The large seeds are easy to manage and most varieties germinate readily. Plus, the resulting blooms are gorgeous and sweetly scented.
  • How to grow potatoes using the Potato Grow Bag.
  • Most garden visitors -- more than 95 percent -- are either beneficial or benign.
  • Pay attention to light, water and fertilizer and your phalaenopsis will rebloom.
  • It's easy to your own. All you need is potting soil and a pot.
  • Five ways gardeners can welcome pollinators; a list of plants that draw butterflies, hummingbirds and beneficial bees.
  • If you want to avoid using broad-spectrum poisons in your garden, the key to success is taking time to observe and try to understand what’s really going on. It’s the single most important action you can take.
  • Sometimes when plants look sick or appear to be under attack by insects, the symptoms are actually a sign that the plant is being stressed by environmental factors. Here are some common symptoms of stress and the conditions that cause them.
  • If you love asparagus and want to grow some yourself, waste no time in getting an asparagus bed planted.
  • Learn when and how to prune for abundant blooms.
  • When starting seeds indoors, you'll want to use the right growing medium and be sure to give your plants adequate light. But what sort of container will you plant the seeds into?
  • In a few hours, you can create a planter made with hypertufa, a material that has an ancient, hand-hewn quality. Hypertufa containers are perfect for alpines, succulents, mosses and even tiny evergreens.
  • Learn how to plant and harvest garlic in two step-by-step slideshows.
  • When you think about what to plant in your planters and windowboxes, consider making a few containers that are designed to attract birds and butterflies. The compositions in the slideshow are sure to inspire you.
  • When stored correctly in their own papery wrappers, some types of onions will maintain their quality for as long as a year.
  • Hot weather is tougher on plants than it is on people. It’s easy to understand why, when you consider that our bodies contain about 60 percent water and most plants are 85 to 90 percent water.
  • Details for two gardens that ensure bouquets from summer to fall.
  • You don't have to reside in the Sunbelt to grow citrus. Dwarf varieties are well-suited to containers, allowing gardeners everywhere to enjoy the benefits of homegrown citrus trees.
  • If you have an abundance of onions, make caramelized onions and store them in your freezer.
  • Try a few alliums in your flower gardens this season and discover the grace and good manners of these under-appreciated perennials.
  • How to choose the best cooking techniques for the variety you have.
  • The Potato Grow Bag is a specialized fabric "pot" that makes it possible to grow potatoes in almost any sunny location — even on a deck or a porch.
  • If you're trying to keep birds from your crops, any scare device will work for a few days. But the most effective technique is exclusion.
  • Cowpots are biodegradable, keeping plastic waste out of the landfill. And they're not only made from a renewable resource, they're taking a potential pollutant out of the waste stream. They're made in the U.S. by farmers, and they grow happy seedlings. What's not to love?
  • Autumn temperatures send mice scurrying to warmer places, such as homes. The key to keeping them out? Change the habitat to make it less mouse-friendly.
  • Flowers are the stars of the garden, but what do you do when the inevitable garden gaps appear? Experienced gardeners know that it helps to have a few well-chosen ornaments on hand.
  • Step-by-step instructions for delicious pickled and fermented foods.
  • In areas where rainfall is abundant, gardeners often struggle to grow lavender and other Mediterranean natives that require well-drained soils. The perfect solution: Create a “dry garden” in a raised bed.
  • Preparing fresh herbs, vegetables and fruits for tonight’s supper or preserving them for later use is faster and easier with the right tools. We’ve assembled some of our favorites, so you can enjoy your backyard harvest all year long.
  • Proponents suggest that, just as the moon's gravitational pull affects the tides, it also has a more subtle but still relevant effect on soil moisture, pulling it toward the soil surface. If this is true, then perhaps more moisture near the soil surface could improve germination.
  • Learn how to make your own pickles, sauerkraut and other preserved foods. Specially designed crocks make it easy.
  • Let this be the year that you carve a jack-o-lantern that you grew in your own backyard. Pumpkins are not difficult to grow – even in raised beds.
  • Simple, homemade dressings enhance the flavors in just-picked salad greens.
  • With a some well-placed decor and a few nature-themed ideas, you can brighten a winter landscape.
  • Josée Landry and Michel Beauchamp of Drummondville, Quebec, ripped out their lawn to install a stylish raised-bed garden in their front yard in 2012. Little did they know it would trigger an international controversy. In a slideshow, see the transformation of their front yard from grass to garden.
  • Photos from Felder Rushing, author of "Bottle Trees and the Whimsical Art of Garden Glass."
  • Learn how to plant and grow strawberries; with video that shows how to plant bareroot strawberries.
  • Beekeeping and gardening go naturally together. Here are some things prospective beekeepers should consider.
  • Drinks made with just-picked herbs, fruit, and vegetables as flavorings and garnishes are the toast of the summer party season.
  • Great recipes for savory tarts, made with garden-fresh ingredients. Tarts include: Tarragon-Carrot Tart, Caramelized French Onion Tart and Roasted Vegetable Tart.
  • Spring and summer harvests make for great for salads, but nothing enhances the flavor of a fall bounty like soup.
  • No time for a traditional, in-ground vegetable garden? A raised bed is a shortcut to a plentiful harvest, even in the first year.
  • With the right amount of light, it's fairly easy to grow lettuce indoors, all through the winter.
  • Though we seek black-and-white answers for gardening questions, the truth is often a gray area. Most answers begin with the words, "It depends …."
  • Frying isn't the only option. Tart and firm, green tomatoes hold up well in long-cooked relishes and chutneys.
  • Vegetables and fruits have taken center stage in the American landscape — at last. And why not? Homegrown vegetables and fruit are good for you, they get picked at their prime and only have to travel as far as your kitchen.
  • Two theme gardens showcase herbs, edible flowers and greens. When planted in elevated raised beds, the harvest is at a comfortable height, and often the planter can be set up right outside the kitchen door.
  • To help ensure your success with roses, we've gathered some new rose care products and some long-time customer favorites to help you get the most from your roses.
  • Do you believe in magic? Miniature gardens welcome wee folk to your back yard. Start with bits of bark, twigs and seeds ... and go from there.
  • The Seedstarting Grow Kit is a convenient, self-watering system. Simply add water and the no-mess, eco-friendly coconut coir pellets expand to fill each cell.
  • Peas are are one of the first things you can plant in the spring, but getting the planting time right is tricky. The key is to start early -- but not too early.
  • Beautiful, drought-tolerant planters feature easy-care succulents that thrive indoors and out.
  • Tired of spending time every weekend with a noisy lawn mower? Here’s an alternative: slow-growing turf. These fescue turf grasses are green and lush, but naturally slow-growing, so you mow only four to five times a year.
  • Slideshow gives highlights of the 2012 show, one of the world's largest flower shows.
  • Onions can be a confusing vegetable for new gardeners. Should you grow long-day or short-day onions? Seeds, seedlings or sets? How are storage onions different from sweet onions? Here's how to sort out the terms.
  • Nasturtiums are among the easiest flowers to grow from seed. The seeds are fairly large and they can be planted right in the garden. To get an earlier start, you can plant indoors.
  • Here are some ways to help plants thrive while you're on vacation, so you can come home to healthy gardens and happy houseplants.
  • In the vegetable garden, late summer is the seventh-inning stretch; time to step back and make strategy: How do I make the most of the remaining season? What's working and what needs help? Here are a few tips from an old pro on how to score big in the end.
  • Growing a small garden is like living in a small house: it is not as easy as it looks. Choose the right plants and you'll have a bountiful harvest.
  • Gardening gets more difficult as we age. However, by using the right tools and techniques, gardening remains in reach at any age.
  • Monarchs are in trouble because of the elimination of milkweed that used to grow in farm fields. Grow a patch of milkweed in your backyard, which will provide food for monarch caterpillars.
  • When backyard beans are plentiful, use these recipes and techniques to ensure that you'll never tire of another harvest.
  • Water is the key to a healthy, productive garden. With our Snip-n-Drip automatic watering system, you can get water directly to the plants, without wasting a single drop. It makes irrigation easy, whether you have a large garden with rows or a few raised beds.
  • With just a few simple items, you can grow microgreens at home. It only takes a few weeks to harvest your first crop, and you can do it all on a sunny windowsill.
  • Rhubarb is one of the least demanding of all crops. Once established, there's little work required. A happy plant will produce for decades. Grow rhubarb in full sun, in rich, lightly moist soil.
  • What's an "herb spiral"? Imagine a long garden row, about 25 feet long. Then, take that row and coil it around and upward into a spiral. This spiral now has the length of a row, but it only occupies a circle that's 6 feet in diameter.
  • Six reasons to grow a houseplant (or two).
  • To attract butterflies and other pollinators, simply plant flowers they love -- lots of them. The designs here feature blooms that are rich in color and nectar, ensuring that you will welcome dozens of beneficial insects -- especially butterflies.
  • Start by planting a tree. With this simple act, you celebrate the earth by increasing the leafy canopy. According to the U.S.Department of Agriculture, "One acre of forest absorbs six tons of carbon dioxide and puts out four tons of oxygen.
  • Having the right tools at hand makes the yardwork more fun and efficient.
  • Lawn has long enjoyed its unique status as our country's default groundcover — rolled out like wall-to-wall carpeting around every house. But the reign of grass is being challenged. Garden Designer Pam Penick shows how to design spaces with less lawn.
  • We asked kitchen garden expert Ellen Ecker Ogden to come up with planting plans for a couple of our Elevated Raised Beds. The results, both beautiful and delicious, are here.
  • Find inspiration for updating your patio, adding curb appeal, drought-proofing your landscape, and other do-it-yourself projects. Our videos and slideshows offer step-by-step, how-to information on creative, easy and affordable ways to transform your living space.
  • Simple syrup is an important component to many cocktails because it adds sweetness without the grit of sugar. Also great for making homemade sodas.
  • With well-designed, innovative pots, planters and raised beds, you can cultivate a healthy, homegrown, freshest-ever harvest, just steps from your kitchen.
  • By planting heirloom varieties, you can start a tradition of seed-saving in your garden. Start with a few selections chosen by Diane Ott Whealy, one of the founders of the Seed Savers Exchange, who shares some of her favorite vegetables, fruits and flowers.
  • Use the Soil Calculator to determine how much soil you need to fill your raised bed.
  • Learn how to harvest the rain—right from your roof
  • With the increase in recycling and reuse programs, it's easier than ever to reduce the amount of trash in our garbage cans. But we can do more. Some estimates say that a single household can divert 300 pounds a year from the waste stream.
  • Baked apples are comfort food—simple, old-fashioned treats that are easy to make, and healthy, too.
  • Monarch butterfly populations have been declining over the past decade, with sharp declines in the last few years. What can gardeners do to help ?
  • Use April McGreger's recipes to concentrate the essence of fresh tomatoes into condiments that deliver a burst of intense tomato flavor—and make the most of space in the pantry.

Sign Up for E-mail

Get the latest news, tips and gardening info!

Sign Up
Looking for Product Instructions?

Assembly instructions, diagrams and other types of product information are available on product pages. To find it, search for the product, go to the product page and click on the "How-To and Instructions" tab.

We're a B Corp!

Gardener's Supply is pleased to be part of a class of companies called B Corps. With this certification comes a dual mission that combines bottom-line success and social responsibility. In short: Do well and do good.

Learn More

Learn and Share

Our website is packed with how-tos and inspiration, as well as opportunities to share with fellow gardeners. Check back often to view new articles, videos, blog posts and Facebook updates and join our online community.

Learn & Share

Satisfaction Guaranteed

We stand by the quality of our products and our service. If for any reason you're not satisfied with your purchase, you can return it to us for an exchange, refund, or credit.

Learn More